Conférences de Dava Sobel (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 20-22/05/2014)

Mercredi 21 mai 2014 (14h-17h)
"Science in Writing: Expert Meeting with Dava Sobel"
 
Dava Sobel, a former New York Times science reporter, is the author of Longitude (1995), Galileo's Daughter (2000), The Planets (2005), and A More Perfect Heaven (2011). In her forty years as a science journalist she has written for many magazines, including Audubon, Discover, Life, and The New Yorker.
 
The expert meeting brings together a selected group of people from the media and communications departments to discuss the challenges, opportunities, difficulties and evolution in the ways to write or communicate about science, research and the people behind it.
 
In her introductory talk Dava Sobel will elaborate on her own science writing as well as in her experience as a journalist and award-winning author. Sobel will indicate a series of criteria and conditions necessary to comply with if the written articles or texts will serve a non-scientific public in the first place, yet, also offering enough intellectual stimuli for scientific researchers too.
 
ICAB Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Campus Etterbeek (Site Arsenal)
Rue des Pierres Blanches, 4
1040 Bruxelles
 
Autres conférences :
 
Mardi 20 mai 2014 (14h-17h)
"The Illustrated Longitude" (Dava Sobel)
 
Until the 18th Century the longitude problem was one of the biggest dilemma's sailors had been faced with for centuries. Lacking the ability to measure their longitude, they were literally lost at sea as soon as they lost sight of land. In this lecture, science writer Dava Sobel will tell the story of a scientific quest and of John Harrison's forty-year obsession with building his perfect timekeeper, known today as the chronometer. Numerous illustrations will support the story, which is alsoa fascinating history of astronomy, navigation, and clockmaking, and opens a new window on our world.
 
U-Residence Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Campus Etterbeek
Boulevard Général Jacques, 271
1050 Bruxelles
 
Jeudi 22 mai 2014 (18h-19h30)
"Copernicus's Heliocentric Theory" (Dava Sobel, Kate McIntosh et Jerry Killick)
 
By 1514, Nicolaus Copernicus had developed an outline of his heliocentric theory, in which he placed the sun at the center of the universe. Over the next two decades, he worked on a revolutionary manuscript, which for fear of ridicule, he refused to publish. In 1539, a young German mathematician, Georg Joachim Rheticus, traveled to Poland to seek out Copernicus. In 1543, just before Copernicus's death, Rheticus had his master's manuscript published as De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres).
The play 'And the Sun Stood Still' imagines Rheticus's struggle to convince Copernicus to let his manuscript see the light of day. Two scenes of this play will be presented in a staged reading by the actors and performers Kate McIntosh and Jerry Killick.
 
Kaaistudio's
Rue Notre Dame du Sommeil, 81
1000 Bruxelles
 
 

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